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Founded in 1958 in Kandy by A.S. Karunaratna, Richard Abeyasekera, and Ven. Nyanaponika Thera, the BPS became one of the premier publishers of English-language, Theravada Buddhist material during the 60s through the 80s and 90s during the massive growth in interest from the anglophone world. Today, most of their publications are available free of charge.

Featured Publications:

A classic translation of this classic book of poetry from the Pāli Canon.

A straightforward and practical guide, this book gives detailed descriptions and explanations for the most important religious practices for lay Buddhists. Good reading for anthropologists of Buddhism, for those who have recently converted, or those who are thinking about it, this book is absolutely essential and remains my first recommendation for learning how to be a Buddhist.

In this beautiful letter to a friend (and one of my favorite books period), Thay offers practical advice and encouragement to cultivate mindfulness: the quality of presence and wakefulness in our life. From washing the dishes to answering the phone, he reminds us that each moment holds within it the seeds of understanding and peace. Highly recommended for all, especially newcomers to Buddhism or meditation, or anyone looking to brighten their day.

An important sutta on Right Speech, giving the Buddha’s famous injunction to “not insist on local language.”

Tucked away in the Samyutta Nikaya among the “connected sayings on causality” is a short formalized text entitled the Upanisa Sutta, the “Discourse on Supporting Conditions.” Though at first glance hardly conspicuous among the many interesting suttas in this collection, this little discourse turns out upon repeated examination to be of tremendous doctrinal importance.

The world is led by craving,
By craving it is defiled,
And craving is that one thing
Controlled by which all follow.

A lucid and compelling explanation of the Noble Eightfold Path by a renowned contemporary scholar of Pāli and Early Buddhism. Highly recommended for everyone interested in Buddhism.

Is it possible, venerable sir, to point out any fruit of recluseship that is visible here and now?