A former musician, Bhante Sujato became a monk in 1994 in Thailand and lived there for several years before returning to his native Australia. He spent several years at Bodhinyana Monastery in Western Australia before going on to found Santi Forest Monastery in 2003.

Sujato co-founded the website SuttaCentral along with Rod Bucknell and John Kelly for which he created public domain translations of the four primary Nikāyas of the Pali Canon. Sujato, along with his teacher Ajahn Brahm, were involved with the re-establishment of Bhikkhuni Ordination in the Theravada Tradition.

~ Adapted from the Wikipedia article

Selected Works

SuttaCentral hosts sources and free translations of Early Buddhist Texts, meticulously organized by parallels, books, languages and searchable with several large indexes. It’s your one-stop-shop for researching the EBTs.

while the Theravādins have preserved the clearest and best-understood early texts referring to the in-between state, their philosophical posture prevented them from investigating and describing this in any detail. For that we shall have to listen to the other schools, starting with the Puggalavādins and Sarvāstivādins, as passed down through the Chinese and Tibetan traditions.

A concise and readable survey of early Buddhist studies, showing the wide evidence we have in support of the authenticity of the EBTs and how we can know about ancient India at all.

We wouldn’t say “this is proof of reincarnation,” but I would say it’s strong evidence of something like it.

Translations:

The Buddha describes his own meditation on emptiness and tells Ānanda how a meditator can descend into emptiness herself through seclusion and wise attention.

There is a way of developing immersion further

‘I’ve developed the heart’s release by love… Yet somehow ill will still occupies my mind.’

Let them enjoy the filthy, lazy pleasure of possessions, honor, and popularity.

A group of monks tries to figure out the meaning of a difficult poem uttered by the Buddha. After offering several interpretations, the Buddha gives his answer.

Mendicants, these seven perceptions, when developed and cultivated, are very fruitful and beneficial. They culminate in the deathless and end with the deathless. What seven? The perceptions of ugliness, death, repulsiveness of food, dissatisfaction with the whole world, impermanence, suffering in impermanence, and not-self in suffering.

It would be good, lord, if the Blessed One would teach me the Dhamma in brief

A long and entertaining debate with a skeptic who went to extravagant lengths to prove that there is no such thing as an afterlife.

A magisterial compendium of good advice for lay people.

Here the Buddha details the seventh factor of the noble eightfold path—right mindfulness. This collects many of the meditation teachings found throughout the canon, especially the practices focusing on the body, and is regarded as one of the most important discourses in the contemporary Theravada tradition.

And how is a mendicant not skilled in characteristics? It’s when a mendicant doesn’t understand that a fool is characterized by their deeds

A deep discussion between the Bhikkhuni Dhammadinnā and her student, the layman Visākha, on many profound topics, including the very highest meditative attainments.

Suppose a trustworthy and reliable man were to come from the east. He’d approach you and say: ‘Please sir, you should know this. I come from the east. There I saw a huge mountain that reached the clouds. And it was coming this way, crushing all creatures.’

I say it’s not possible to know, see or reach the end of the world by traveling. But I also say there’s no making an end of suffering without reaching the end of the world.

Suppose a person was to catch six animals, with diverse territories and feeding grounds, and tie them up with a strong rope.

One should rein in the mind thus: ‘This path is fearful, dangerous, strewn with thorns, covered by jungle, a deviant path, an evil path, a way beset by scarcity. This is a path followed by inferior people; it is not the path followed by superior people. This is not for you.’ In this way the mind should be reined in

Suppose a person was to catch six animals, with diverse territories and feeding grounds, and tie them up with a strong rope.

In this controversial sutta, the Buddha declares that everything an individual experiences is not necessarily the result of past karma.

In this famous simile, the Buddha explains how rare it is to receive a human rebirth in the time of a Buddha and encourages us to use the opportunity well.

The Buddha is confronted by an angry and rude Brahmin.